‹‹                                                            ››
    It is remarkable what a value is still put upon wood even in this age and in this new country, a value more permanent and universal than that of gold.  After all our discoveries and inventions no man will go by a pile of wood.  It is as precious to us as it was to our Saxon and Norman ancestors.  If they made their bows of it, we make our gun-stocks of it.  Michaux, more than thirty years ago, says that the price of wood for fuel in New York and Philadelphia "nearly equals, and sometimes exceeds, that of the best wood in Paris, though this immense capital annually requires more than three hundred thousand cords, and is surrounded to the distance of three hundred miles by cultivated plains."  In this town the price of wood rises almost steadily, and the only question is, how much higher it is to be this year than it was the last.  Mechanics and tradesmen who come in person to the forest on no other errand, are sure to attend the wood auction, and even pay a high price for the privilege of gleaning after the woodchopper.  It is now many years that men have resorted to the forest for fuel and the materials of the arts: the New Englander and the New Hollander, the Parisian and the Celt, the farmer and Robin Hood, Goody Blake and Harry Gill; in most parts of the world the prince and the peasant, the scholar and the savage, equally require still a few sticks from the forest to warm them and cook their food.  Neither could I do without them.
‹‹                              random                              ››
W