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    The change from storm and winter to serene and mild weather, from dark and sluggish hours to bright and elastic ones, is a memorable crisis which all things proclaim.  It is seemingly instantaneous at last.  Suddenly an influx of light filled my house, though the evening was at hand, and the clouds of winter still overhung it, and the eaves were dripping with sleety rain.  I looked out the window, and lo! where yesterday was cold gray ice there lay the transparent pond already calm and full of hope as in a summer evening, reflecting a summer evening sky in its bosom, though none was visible overhead, as if it had intelligence with some remote horizon.  I heard a robin in the distance, the first I had heard for many a thousand years, methought, whose note I shall not forget for many a thousand more -- the same sweet and powerful song as of yore. O the evening robin, at the end of a New England summer day!  If I could ever find the twig he sits upon!  I mean he; I mean the twig. This at least is not the Turdus migratorius.  The pitch pines and shrub oaks about my house, which had so long drooped, suddenly resumed their several characters, looked brighter, greener, and more erect and alive, as if effectually cleansed and restored by the rain.  I knew that it would not rain any more.  You may tell by looking at any twig of the forest, ay, at your very wood-pile, whether its winter is past or not.  As it grew darker, I was startled by the honking of geese flying low over the woods, like weary travellers getting in late from Southern lakes, and indulging at last in unrestrained complaint and mutual consolation.  Standing at my door, I could bear the rush of their wings; when, driving toward my house, they suddenly spied my light, and with hushed clamor wheeled and settled in the pond.  So I came in, and shut the door, and passed my first spring night in the woods.
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